This article was written by Raquel Reyes, from Avanzado 2.

Jane Austen, the eighteenth-century writer who is considered one of the greatest novelists in English literature is the author of novels such as “Persuasion” and “Pride and Prejudice”, her most famous one. She has her own tourist attraction, where you we can visit the villages of her life and the locations related to her novels.

STEVENTON

Jane Austen was born at Steventon rectory in 1775. There, she wrote her early novels and poems (1782-1800). The house where she lived was demolished but if you want to visit the area you can book in Steventon House Hotel, a hotel that respects the atmosphere of that period.

BATH

In 1800 her father took the family to Bath near Bristol where you can find the Jane Austen Centre at 40 Gay Street.

For minimal cost you can tour the building and its permanent exhibits. Don’t forget to visit the Regency themed Tea Rooms up on the 2nd floor.

The world-famous Roman Baths is an absolute must-do. Based around Britain’s only natural hot springs, the Romans built a magnificent temple and bathing complex.

The Palladian Bridge at Prior Park is another must-do.

         

Accommodation in Bath. You can book at Jane Austen’s house. This 18th century Georgian apartment has been sensitively refurbished to afford luxury living.

         

LYME REGIS

Lyme Regis, a coastal down in the southern part of England, is visited by Jane and her family in 1803 and 1804. The geological importance of Lyme Regis is internationally known.

                         

It is said that here Jane meets a man who fall in love with her. They decide to see each other again, but he dies. Maybe that is why the place plays a substantial role in Austin’s “Persuasion”.

CHAWTON VILLAGE

On early 1809 she and her mother were offered by Edward to live in Chawton village. You can find the house where she lived his last eight years of life as a museum that contains small treasures: the table where she wrote and revised the manuscript of the novel Pride and Prejudice and Emma.

WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL

On 1817 she died by Addison’s disease or Hodgkin’s lymphoma or bovine tuberculosis, nobody knows. She is buried in Winchester Cathedral.

            

Definitely, this tour is a unique experience for lovers of this extraordinary novelist.

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